Thai Sauces Reipes

Descriptions and Uses of Some Thai Sauces

Prik Naam Plaa: Fish sauce made with sliced chilies and sometimes, lime juice. This sauce goes with any dish. Sort of like a universal sauce. Fish sauce is fishy and salty tasting. Used instead of salt, it is made from fermented fish, water, peppers and salt. For those who can’t tolerate the spiciness of prik kii noo (mouse shit peppers), only the fish sauce will be offered.

Naam Som Prik Dong: Sliced or pureed chilies, vinegar and a little salt. This is a pickled sauce. Used mostly in noodle dishes like Lad Nar, Pad See Aew and noodle soups.

Naam Plaa Hua Hom: Fish sauce, sliced chilies, sliced onions and lime juice.
Served with egg dishes.

Naam Plaa Manow: Fish sauce, sliced chilies, crushed garlic and lime juice.
Served with beef, poultry and fish dishes.

See Eeu Prik Tham: Chopped or pureed chilies, Thai dark or light sweeet soy sauce with or without vinegar.
This sauce is usually served with appetizers like steamed dumplings and spring rolls.

Sriracha Sauce: This sauce comes in a bottle and is available in any Thai food store or market. It has a unique blend of chilies, garlic, salt and vinegar. It goes well with eggs, chicken, steak and seafood..

Prik Pone: Dry ground roasted chilies flakes. Sprinkle over rice or noodle dishes for added spiciness only. Good for taking along on trips.

In Thailand, people are known to keep adding one or more of these sauces to their food from the beginning to the end of the meal. So the next time you’re in a Thai restaurant, ask for them and add some to your favorite dish. You may be surprised at how it can improve the flavor of your food.

Here are some recipes from the heart of Thailand

Naam Jim Kiga

Description

This is a common and tasty dip for barbeque style foods.

Ingredients

  • 6 tablespoons prik ki nu (green birdshit chili), sliced thinly
  • 6 tablespoons prik ki nu daeng (red birdshit chili), sliced thinly
  • 4 tablespoons hom daeng (shallots), sliced thinly
  • 3 tablespoons phak chi (coriander plant including root), chopped
  • 2 tablespoons kratiem (garlic), sliced thinly
  • 1 tablespoon Naam manao (lime juice)
  • 1 tablespoon Naam pla (fish sauce)

Method

Saut?e the chilis, shallots and garlic in a little hot oil.

After cooling pur?e the mixture in a food processor of mortar and pestle.

If the coriander and shallots are added at the last minute the mixture will keep for several weeks in a refrigerator.

Cilantro Pesto – Rahk Pahk Chee-Gratiem-Prik Thai

Yield: 6 servings

Ingredients

1 ts whole white or black peppercorns
2 tb Coarsely chopped fresh Cilantro roots or leaves
2 tb Coarsely chopped garlic

Method

Using a mortar and pestle or a spice grinder, crush or grind the peppercorns to a fine powder. Combine the pepper, cilantro roots and garlic; work the three ingredients into a fairly smooth paste in the mortar or in a small blender or food processor. If you use a blender or food processor, you may need to add a little vegetable oil or water to ease the grinding. Make about 1/4 cup. For an industrial strength batch use 1 tb peppercorns, 1/2 cup cilantro roots and 1/2 cup garlic. To store the pesto for later use, put in a glass jar, pour a little oil onto the surface to cover it and seal tightly. It will keep nicely for about 1 week in the refrigerator.

Naam Jim Seua Rong Hai – (Tiger Tears Sauce)

Description

This sauce has several regional variations, and this recipe is for the Korat version

The two most important variations are: (a) it can be made with a mixture of fresh chopped chilis and powdered chilis, and (b) it can be made with lime juice instead of tamarind juice.

Ingredients

1 tbs prik phon (powdered red ‘birdshit’ chilis)
5 tbs naam makham piag (tamarind juice)
1/4 cup naam plaa (fish sauce)
khao koor (see method)
1-2 tbs naam tan paep (palm sugar)

Method

First in a medium hot wok or skillet, toast 3-4 tablespoons of uncooked long grain rice until golden, then cool, and grind to a coarse powder in a mortar and pestle, food processor or spice mill. This powder is known as khao koor. Any excess will keep indefinately in a well stoppered container.

Grind dried red chilis to a fine powder, first breaking them, and shaking out and discarding any loose seeds. You will need about a cup of powdered chili (or reduce the other quantities accordingly).

Add about 1 tablespoon of khao koor to the chilis, and then add tamarind juice and fish sauce, in the proportion of three parts tamarind juice to one part fish sauce, stirring until the mixture forms a thin paste of the consistency of tomato ketchup.

Add a little palm sugar to your personal taste.

Storage

The sauce will keep for 3-4 weeks in a well stoppered container in a refrigerator.

Naam Prik Kapi

Universal Thai dipping sauce

Description

This is the staple dipping sauce eaten with almost anything, and almost universally added to the table setting of any but the most casual dinner. It is as much a signature dish of Thai cuisine as the more familiar (in the west) pad Thai and is traditionally the one dish, other than desserts, cooked by the ‘mistress’ of the house, as opposed to the servants (if ya’ have money!), and is often extremely intricate in its preparation. There are probably as many recipes as there are Thai people, and this is but one example.

The eggplants used – makheua phuang – are very small; the size of green garden peas, and are often added to curries as a crisp morsel that pops in the mouth. You could substitute the golf ball sized makheua pro, but the best alternative to the real thing is probably to omit them.

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons of Naam pla (fish sauce)
  • 3 tablespoons of Naam manao (lime juice)
  • 2 tablespoons of makheua phuang
  • 1 tablespoon kratiem (garlic) chopped
  • 1 tablespoon prik ki nu daeng ( red birdshit chilis), chopped
  • 1 tablespoon kapi (fermented shrimp paste)
  • 1 tablespoon sugar

Method

In a wok, lightly fry the shrimp paste until aromatic.
Crush all the ingredients in a mortar and pestle or food processor, except
the makheua phuang which is coarsely chopped and added to the paste after mixing

Northern Thai Tomato-&-Meat Sauce – (Naam Prik Ong)

Yield: 4 servings

Description

Not unlike a That version of spaghetti sauce, this is from the regional cuisine of north Thailand. Note: Dried shrimp and shrimp paste give off a strong aroma during cooking, but the flavor mellows.

Ingredients

1/4 lb Pork tenderloin
1 ts Minced fresh lemon grass
2 ts Vegetable oil
1 lb Ripe plum tomatoes, chopped 1 tb Minced garlic (3 cloves)
1 lg Shallot, minced
1/2 c Defatted chicken stock or water
2 Serrano chilies, with seeds, chopped
1 tb Fish sauce
1 ts Tiny dried shrimp, minced,-or 1/2 tsp. shrimp paste
1 ts Sugar

Method

Place pork in a food processor and using an on/off motion, process until it is ground. Alternatively, chop pork with a sharp knife. Set aside.

In a heavy, medium-sized saucepan, heat oil over medium high heat. Add garlic and stir-fry for 1 to 2 minutes, or until browned. Add shallots, chilies, dried shrimp or shrimp paste and lemon grass and stir-fry for 30 seconds. Add the pork and stir-fry for about 1 minute, or until browned. Add tomatoes, stock or water, fish sauce and sugar and increase the heat to high. Cook, stirring frequently, for 2 minutes, or until the mixture boils vigorously. Reduce heat to low and simmer, uncovered, for 15 to 20 minutes, or until slightly thickened. Serve with sticky rice.

Serves 4 as a main dish or 6 in combination with other dishes.

64 CALORIES FOR EACH OF 6 SERVINGS: 6 G PROTEIN, 3 G FAT, 5 G CARBOHYDRATE; 127 MG SODIUM; 15 MG CHOLESTEROL.

Peanut Sauce – Naam Jeem Satay

Yield: 1 servings

Description

This richly flavored sauce is usually served with satays.

Ingredients

1 3/4 c Coconut Milk
3 tb Sugar
2 tb Red Curry Paste
1 c Ground Roasted Peanuts
1/4 c Fish Sauce (Naam Plaa)

Method

Combine all the ingredients in a medium saucepan and simmer for 15 minutes, stirring constantly. Makes 2-1/2 cups.

From: Thailand The Beautiful Cookbook.

Sweet And Sour (And Hot!) Fish Sauce (Prik Naam Plaa)

Yield: 6 servings

Description

This is a sauce for sweetening/salting/spicing-up any dish being eaten

Ingredients

4 md Clove Garlic, Finely Chopped
1/4 c Fish Sauce (Naam Plaa)
1 tb Hot Red Chili Or Cayenne Pepper Flakes, Crushed**
1/2 c White Sugar
1 c Warm Water
6 tb Fresh Lime Juice
**To make it authentic, you should use Thai Prik Kii Nuu (Mouse Shit Peppers)
Yield: 1 3/4 Cups Of Sauce

Method

Combine all the ingredients in a small bowl and stir well.
Serve at room temperature.

Sweet Hot Garlic Sauce – Naam Jeem Gratiem

Yield: 1 servings

Ingredients

1 c Sugar
2 tb Finely Minced Garlic
1/2 c Water
1 ts Salt
1/2 c White Vinegar
1 tb Garlic Chili Sauce

Method

In a small, heavy saucepan, combine the sugar, water, vinegar, garlic and salt. Bring to a rolling boil over medium heat. Stir to dissolve the sugar and salt and reduce the heat to low.
Simmer until the liquid reduces slightly and thickens to a light syrup. Remove from the heat and stir in the garlic chili sauce.
Cool to room temperature before serving. Transfer the cooled sauce to a tightly sealed jar and store at room temperature for 2 to 3 days. Makes about 1-1/2 cups.

Green Mango Dip – Naam Prik Ma-Muang

Yield: 1 servings

Description

A good dip with seafood and fish, fresh vegetables, and boiled eggs.

Ingredients

8 oz Shredded Green Mango
1/4 c Fish Sauce (Naam Plaa)
6 Cloves Garlic, Minced
2 tb Lime Juice
2 tb Shrimp Paste
2 tb Sugar

Method

Place the shredded mango, garlic and shrimp paste in a mortar and gently mash with the pestle so that the mango is bruised but is still in shreds. Add the remaining ingredients and stir to combine. Remove to a serving bowl and use as a dip for grilled meats or fresh vegetables. Makes 2 cups.

Thai Sweet Chili Sauce

Yield: 8 servings

Ingredients

1/2 c Rice vinegar
1/2 ts Minced serrano chili
1/4 c Sugar
1/2 ts Ground red chili paste
2 tb Plum sauce
1/2 ts Sweet paprika
1 tb Thai fish sauce 1/2 ts Salt
1 tb Fresh lime or lemon juice
1/2 ts All-purpose flour
2 ts Tomato paste
1 tb Water; *mixed into flour
1 ts Minced garlic

Method

Combine all ingredients and 1/2 c water in a small saucepan, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 4 minutes. Let cool. Will keep in refrigerator for 3 days.

Chilis in Oil (Naam Prik Pow)

Yield: 1 serving

Ingredients

4 tb Oil
3 tb Finely chopped garlic
2 tb Sugar
3 tb Finely chopped shallots
1 ts Salt
3 lg Dry red chilis; deseeded — coarsely chopped

Method

Heat the oil, fry the garlic until golden brown, removve with a slotted spoon and set aside. In the same oil fry the shallots until crispy, remove and set aside.
Fry the chilis until they darken, remove and place in a mortar with the shallot and garlic. Pound together. Reheat the oil, add the paste and warm through. Add the sugar and salt and mix well to give a thick black/red sauce.

Hell Dipping Sauce – Naam Prik Na-Rok

Yield: 1 serving

Description

Because it keeps well, this sauce was traditionally used by travelers.

Ingredients

2 c Oil For Deep-Frying
1/2 c Unpeeled Whole Shallots
2 lb Freshwater Fish Fillets
2 tb Shrimp Paste
1 c Dried Green Thai Chili Peppers (Prik Kii Nuu)
1/4 c Fish Sauce (Naam Plaa)
3 tb Palm Sugar
1/2 c Unpeeled Garlic Cloves

Method

Heat the oil in a large skillet to 375øF. Deep-fry the fish
fillets until very crispy and golden brown.

Charcoal-broil/grill the chilies, garlic and shallots until their
outsides are charred. Remove the garlic and shallot skins.

Place the fried fish, chilies, garlic and shallots in a mortar and
mash with the pestle until smooth, or use the blender.

Place the shrimp paste, fish sauce and palm sugar in a small saucepan
and cook for about 15 minutes on medium-high heat, so that the
mixture is reduced to a paste.

Thoroughly combine the mashed ingredients with the reduced sauce ingredients. Store in a jar with a tight-fitting lid and use as a dipping sauce or for cooking.

Chili and Tomato Dip (Naam Prik Nuum)

Yield: 1 serving

Ingredients

2 Medium-sized ripe tomatoes
2 lg Banana chilies or New Mexican or Yellow Wax hot peppers
1 tb Chopped fresh cilantro
2 tb Fish sauce
3 lg Shallots, peeled and halved
1 tb Fresh lime juice
5 Cloves garlic, peeled

Method

Serve as a dip with raw vegetables or as a condiment. If the chilies are very hot, you may want to de-seed them. Dry-frying, a method of roasting, is simply frying without fat.

Heat a large, heavy skillet over high heat. Add whole chilies and dry-fry for about 4 minutes, pressing down with a wooden spoon and turning occasionally. Add shallots and garlic to the skillet and continue to dry-fry, turning occasionally. for about 5 minutes, or until the chili skins are blackened.

Transfer the mixture to a bowl and cool. Add tomatoes to the skillet and dry-fry for about 5 minutes, turning occasionally, or until the skins are blackened. Let cool.

Remove stems from the chilies and cut in half lengthwise. (Do not remove skins.) Remove seeds if you prefer less heat. Core the tomatoes and cut into quarters. (Do not remove skins.) Place chilies, tomatoes, shallots and garlic in a food processor and, pulsing, process until the mixture is coarsely chopped and salsa-like in texture (not pureed). Alternatively, chop vegetables finely with a knife.

Transfer the mixture to a small bowl and stir in cilantro, fish sauce and lime juice. (The dip can be prepared up to 3 days ahead and stored, covered, in the refrigerator.)

Makes 1 1/4 cups.

7 CALORIES PER TABLESPOON: 0 G PROTEIN, 0 G FAT, 2 G CARBOHYDRATE; 12 MG SODIUM; 0 MG CHOLESTEROL.

Naam Jeem Kanom Jeeb (Dumpling Sauce)

Ingredients

2 tbsp light soy sauce (see aew sai)
2 tbsp dark sweet soy sauce (see aew dum) or Chinese Hoisin Sauce
1 tbsp white vinegar
1/4 tsp (or to taste) chopped fresh chilies
1/4 tsp salt

Method

Combine all the ingredients and blend well. Serve with Thai (Kanom Jeeb) or Chinese dumplings. Referigerate any remaining portion in a tightly covered glass jar. It will keep for a long time.